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Anterior Crowns


Woman looking at her fixed toothTeeth that are damaged, suffering from decay or otherwise less than stable can prove to be a risk to your dental health. If they are left untreated, these teeth will ultimately be lost. A tooth in the front of your mouth, considered an anterior tooth, will also contribute to a sense of embarrassment and greater loss since this will be visible in your smile. Crowns offer stability and protection for vulnerable teeth. Anterior crowns can also be used to cosmetically alter the aesthetics of one or more teeth.

At Prosthodontics of Princeton, we take your dental wellness seriously. We understand what it takes to keep your teeth healthy and your smile confident. This includes offering options for anterior crowns.

Where Are Anterior Teeth?


The teeth that are most visible when you smile are your anterior teeth. There are twelve anterior teeth. They include your upper and lower incisors, along with your upper and lower canine teeth. Those people with broad smiles will also show their premolars in the esthetic zone.

Dental Crowns as a Solution


The dental crown is a cap that is placed over the visible part of a tooth that is damaged or otherwise weakened. The crown serves the dual purpose of preventing further damage to the tooth and providing strength to a weakened tooth. The dental crown also restores the natural appearance of the tooth, which maintains the function while also ensuring aesthetics are restored.

Materials Used for Dental Crowns


There are a number of materials that are used to make anterior dental crowns. In most cases, porcelain crowns are used in the esthetic zone or anterior portion of the mouth. There are various types of porcelain used. One of the most esthetic porcelains is the E.max crown which offers tremendous translucency and life-like qualities. For those patients who may be bruxers and apply heavy forces to their teeth, other options for stronger porcelains are available which are quite esthetic as well. Full zirconia and blended zirconia crowns offer strength and beauty in one crown. Although they may not be as translucent as the E.max crown, the zirconia crowns offer the ability to completely block out a discolored tooth and provide beautiful color matching to the remaining natural teeth. Porcelain fused to gold crowns are also an option which provides esthetics, durability and strength

Working with our prosthodontist is the best way to determine which type of crown is best to meet your needs for durability and strength for anterior crowns.

The Crown Procedure


For some situations, a processed temporary will be made in advance of your prep appointment to ensure your temporary will be similar in color to your surrounding teeth. The tooth to be treated is anesthetized and then reduced in size to make adequate space for the final crown. Impressions or scans are made and this information is sent to the lab. A shade is selected prior to the end of this appointment, and photos are taken of the adjacent teeth so the lab is better able to match the overall color and characterization of the teeth. If the crown is not milled in the office, a temporary crown is inserted and the patient is scheduled to return in one month for cementation of the crown.

Once the permanent crown is ready, you will return to the office to have it placed. A few minor adjustments may be needed prior to permanently cementing it in place.

Crowns do not require any special care once they are in place. Brush and floss, as per usual, to ensure your ongoing dental wellness.

Learn more about the benefits of anterior crowns with our prosthodontist at Prosthodontics of Princeton. Call (609) 924-1975 to schedule your consultation.



Phone


(609) 924-1975

Hours


Mon : 8:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday - Thursday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 8:00am - 4:00pm
Saturday: 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM (Once a Month)
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Prosthodontics of Princeton - Steven Isaacson, DMD, 601 Ewing St Suite B-4, Princeton, NJ 08540 \ (609) 924-1975 \ prosthodonticsofprinceton.com \ 9/17/2021 \ Page Phrases: dentist Princeton NJ \ dentist Princeton NJ \